" For Japan, the battle of Midway was indeed a tragic defeat. The Japanese Combined Fleet, placing its faith in ‘quality rather than quantity had long trained and prepared to defeat a numerically superior enemy. Yet at Midway, a stronger Japanese force went down to defeat before a weaker enemy.
… With Midway as the turning point, the fortunes of war appeared definitely to shift from our own to the Allied side. The defeat taught us many lessons and impelled our navy, for the first time since the outbreak of war, to indulge in critical self-examination.”
- Mitsuo Fuchida (led the air strike against Pearl Harbor, was aboard the aircraft carrier Akagi during the battle of Midway)
————————
" They had no right to win. And yet they did, and in doing so, they changed the course of a war."
- Walter Lord, Author 
————————
The Battle of Midway in the Pacific Theater of Operations was one of the most important naval battles of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy (USN), under Admirals Chester W. Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance decisively defeated an attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chuichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondo on Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. Military historian John Keegan called it “the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare.” It was Japan’s first naval defeat since the Battle of Shimonoseki Straits in 1863.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Midway

" For Japan, the battle of Midway was indeed a tragic defeat. The Japanese Combined Fleet, placing its faith in ‘quality rather than quantity had long trained and prepared to defeat a numerically superior enemy. Yet at Midway, a stronger Japanese force went down to defeat before a weaker enemy.

… With Midway as the turning point, the fortunes of war appeared definitely to shift from our own to the Allied side. The defeat taught us many lessons and impelled our navy, for the first time since the outbreak of war, to indulge in critical self-examination.”

- Mitsuo Fuchida (led the air strike against Pearl Harbor, was aboard the aircraft carrier Akagi during the battle of Midway)

————————

" They had no right to win. And yet they did, and in doing so, they changed the course of a war."

- Walter Lord, Author 

————————

The Battle of Midway in the Pacific Theater of Operations was one of the most important naval battles of World War II. Between 4 and 7 June 1942, only six months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, and one month after the Battle of the Coral Sea, the United States Navy (USN), under Admirals Chester W. Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance decisively defeated an attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN), under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chuichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondo on Midway Atoll, inflicting irreparable damage on the Japanese fleet. Military historian John Keegan called it “the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare.” It was Japan’s first naval defeat since the Battle of Shimonoseki Straits in 1863.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Midway


4 days ago with 821 notes
The French Resistance (French: La Résistance française) is the name used to denote the collection of French resistance movements that fought against the Nazi German occupation of France and against the collaborationist Vichy régime during World War II. Résistance cells were small groups of armed men and women (called the Maquis in rural areas), who, in addition to their guerrilla warfare activities, were also publishers of underground newspapers, providers of first-hand intelligence information, and maintainers of escape networks that helped Allied soldiers and airmen trapped behind enemy lines. The men and women of the Résistance came from all economic levels and political leanings of French society, including émigrés; conservative Roman Catholics, including priests; and citizens from the ranks of liberals, anarchists, and communists.
The French Resistance played a significant role in facilitating the Allies’ rapid advance through France following the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, and the lesser-known invasion of Provence on 15 August, by providing military intelligence on the German defenses known as the Atlantic Wall and on Wehrmacht deployments and orders of battle. The Résistance also planned, coordinated, and executed acts of sabotage on the electrical power grid, transportation facilities, and telecommunications networks. It was also politically and morally important to France, both during the German occupation and for decades afterward, because it provided the country with an inspiring example of the patriotic fulfillment of a national imperative, countering an existential threat to French nationhood. The actions of the Résistance stood in marked contrast to the collaboration of the regime based at Vichy.
After the landings in Normandy and Provence, the paramilitary components of the Résistance were organized more formally, into a hierarchy of operational units known, collectively, as the French Forces of the Interior (FFI). Estimated to have a strength of 100,000 in June 1944, the FFI grew rapidly, doubling by the following month, and reaching approximately 400,000 by October of that year.Although the amalgamation of the FFI was, in some cases, fraught with political difficulties, it was ultimately successful, and it allowed France to rebuild the fourth-largest army in the European theatre (1.2 million men) by VE Day in May 1945.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Resistance

The French Resistance (French: La Résistance française) is the name used to denote the collection of French resistance movements that fought against the Nazi German occupation of France and against the collaborationist Vichy régime during World War II. Résistance cells were small groups of armed men and women (called the Maquis in rural areas), who, in addition to their guerrilla warfare activities, were also publishers of underground newspapers, providers of first-hand intelligence information, and maintainers of escape networks that helped Allied soldiers and airmen trapped behind enemy lines. The men and women of the Résistance came from all economic levels and political leanings of French society, including émigrés; conservative Roman Catholics, including priests; and citizens from the ranks of liberals, anarchists, and communists.

The French Resistance played a significant role in facilitating the Allies’ rapid advance through France following the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, and the lesser-known invasion of Provence on 15 August, by providing military intelligence on the German defenses known as the Atlantic Wall and on Wehrmacht deployments and orders of battle. The Résistance also planned, coordinated, and executed acts of sabotage on the electrical power grid, transportation facilities, and telecommunications networks. It was also politically and morally important to France, both during the German occupation and for decades afterward, because it provided the country with an inspiring example of the patriotic fulfillment of a national imperative, countering an existential threat to French nationhood. The actions of the Résistance stood in marked contrast to the collaboration of the regime based at Vichy.

After the landings in Normandy and Provence, the paramilitary components of the Résistance were organized more formally, into a hierarchy of operational units known, collectively, as the French Forces of the Interior (FFI). Estimated to have a strength of 100,000 in June 1944, the FFI grew rapidly, doubling by the following month, and reaching approximately 400,000 by October of that year.Although the amalgamation of the FFI was, in some cases, fraught with political difficulties, it was ultimately successful, and it allowed France to rebuild the fourth-largest army in the European theatre (1.2 million men) by VE Day in May 1945.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Resistance


2 months ago with 1,008 notes
" Never was so much owed by so many to so few… "
- Winston Churchill
The Few were the Allied airmen of the Royal Air Force (RAF) who fought the Battle of Britain in the Second World War. The term comes from Winston Churchill’s phrase “Never, in the field of human conflict, was so much owed by so many to so few.” It also alludes to Shakespeare’s famous speech in his play, Henry V: “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers…”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Few
———-
A redraw of sorts of this two-year-old piece. At the time I was wondering how to interpret the battle of Britain because it gave me a lot to work on. This was the second option at the time. 
So after some time, it came back to me and I figured, what the heck.
Let’s do this.

" Never was so much owed by so many to so few… "

- Winston Churchill

The Few were the Allied airmen of the Royal Air Force (RAF) who fought the Battle of Britain in the Second World War. The term comes from Winston Churchill’s phrase “Never, in the field of human conflict, was so much owed by so many to so few.” It also alludes to Shakespeare’s famous speech in his play, Henry V: “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Few

———-

A redraw of sorts of this two-year-old piece. At the time I was wondering how to interpret the battle of Britain because it gave me a lot to work on. This was the second option at the time. 

So after some time, it came back to me and I figured, what the heck.

Let’s do this.


2 months ago with 526 notes
Jeszcze Polska nie zginęła.
The Polish resistance movement in World War II, with the Home Army at its forefront, was the largest underground resistance in all of Nazi-occupied Europe, covering both German and Soviet zones of occupation.
The Polish defense against the Nazi occupation was an important part of the European anti-fascist resistance movement. It is most notable for disrupting German supply lines to the Eastern Front, providing military intelligence to the British, and for saving more Jewish lives in the Holocaust than any other Allied organization or government. It was a part of the Polish Underground State.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_resistance_movement_in_World_War_II

Jeszcze Polska nie zginęła.

The Polish resistance movement in World War II, with the Home Army at its forefront, was the largest underground resistance in all of Nazi-occupied Europe, covering both German and Soviet zones of occupation.

The Polish defense against the Nazi occupation was an important part of the European anti-fascist resistance movement. It is most notable for disrupting German supply lines to the Eastern Front, providing military intelligence to the British, and for saving more Jewish lives in the Holocaust than any other Allied organization or government. It was a part of the Polish Underground State.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_resistance_movement_in_World_War_II


2 months ago with 715 notes
Just two years ago.
I’m sentimental about it.

Just two years ago.

I’m sentimental about it.


4 months ago with 42 notes
Face studies of a revamped art.

Face studies of a revamped art.


6 months ago with 15 notes

Anonymous said: Hello doll! (OuO)/) I have two questions for you: 1. Have you ever drawn Romano by himself before? Because I know you've drawn him with other people before. (Please correct me if I'm wrong. Only being able to be on the mobile app sucks sometimes because of the limit you have.) 2. Where do you get such beautiful quotes? (If they are quotes. I haven't the slightest idea.) and one more thing: Your art is absolutely gorgeous! I love it so much /)u(\ And thank you for taking the time to answer~

Hello! OwO)/

1. I have! I usually drew him wearing his white robes on, whether alone:

image

or with Feli:

image

image

I especially liked portraying Lovi as his religious self rather than his usual short-tempered sweetie self we always see. Thank you for that question. I might do more art of him soon when my research deviates to his path again.^^

2. The quotes are usually taken from the event itself, if not inspired by it. Usually when I wanted to draw an event/a historical personage, I look up quotes connected to them from the internet or from my books, and pick the one that best describes the event or the essence of the event. World Wars, for example, have a lot of memorable quotes, ranging from the allies to the axis, from the civilians to the higher-ups. Lots of quotes, in varying languages, varying feelings and mindsets, inspirational or ironic.

And wow thank you for the compliments. <3 I am terribly flattered and touched that you liked my art a lot. <3

Thank you as well for the nice questions. <3


6 months ago with 15 notes
It was the song they sang as they marched to the trenches. &#8220;We&#8217;re Here Because We&#8217;re Here.&#8221; It was sung to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, a sardonic joke sung in full-throated defiance of death. &#8220;We&#8217;re here because we&#8217;re here because we&#8217;re here because we&#8217;re here.&#8221;
But underlying that song there is a question: a question to which the song gives no answer, stark in its simplicity. &#8220;Why are we here?&#8221;
http://cjstone.hubpages.com/hub/Were-Here-Because-Were-Here
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-
" But the song that summed up the First World War the best was the simplest one of all."
Says it all really.&#8221;
- Horrible Histories: The Frightful First World War

It was the song they sang as they marched to the trenches. “We’re Here Because We’re Here.” It was sung to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, a sardonic joke sung in full-throated defiance of death. “We’re here because we’re here because we’re here because we’re here.”

But underlying that song there is a question: a question to which the song gives no answer, stark in its simplicity. “Why are we here?”

http://cjstone.hubpages.com/hub/Were-Here-Because-Were-Here

———————————————————-

" But the song that summed up the First World War the best was the simplest one of all."

Says it all really.”

- Horrible Histories: The Frightful First World War


7 months ago with 1,254 notes
Thanks to the fandom being alive again&#8230;
Decided to have a new take on this old baby.
I like it better now.

Thanks to the fandom being alive again…

Decided to have a new take on this old baby.

I like it better now.


10 months ago with 191 notes
Just a little something to look forward to.

Just a little something to look forward to.


1 year ago with 34 notes
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