Face studies of a revamped art.

Face studies of a revamped art.


1 month ago with 11 notes

Anonymous asked: Hello doll! (OuO)/) I have two questions for you: 1. Have you ever drawn Romano by himself before? Because I know you've drawn him with other people before. (Please correct me if I'm wrong. Only being able to be on the mobile app sucks sometimes because of the limit you have.) 2. Where do you get such beautiful quotes? (If they are quotes. I haven't the slightest idea.) and one more thing: Your art is absolutely gorgeous! I love it so much /)u(\ And thank you for taking the time to answer~

Hello! OwO)/

1. I have! I usually drew him wearing his white robes on, whether alone:

image

or with Feli:

image

image

I especially liked portraying Lovi as his religious self rather than his usual short-tempered sweetie self we always see. Thank you for that question. I might do more art of him soon when my research deviates to his path again.^^

2. The quotes are usually taken from the event itself, if not inspired by it. Usually when I wanted to draw an event/a historical personage, I look up quotes connected to them from the internet or from my books, and pick the one that best describes the event or the essence of the event. World Wars, for example, have a lot of memorable quotes, ranging from the allies to the axis, from the civilians to the higher-ups. Lots of quotes, in varying languages, varying feelings and mindsets, inspirational or ironic.

And wow thank you for the compliments. <3 I am terribly flattered and touched that you liked my art a lot. <3

Thank you as well for the nice questions. <3


1 month ago with 9 notes
It was the song they sang as they marched to the trenches. &#8220;We&#8217;re Here Because We&#8217;re Here.&#8221; It was sung to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, a sardonic joke sung in full-throated defiance of death. &#8220;We&#8217;re here because we&#8217;re here because we&#8217;re here because we&#8217;re here.&#8221;
But underlying that song there is a question: a question to which the song gives no answer, stark in its simplicity. &#8220;Why are we here?&#8221;
http://cjstone.hubpages.com/hub/Were-Here-Because-Were-Here
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-
" But the song that summed up the First World War the best was the simplest one of all."
Says it all really.&#8221;
- Horrible Histories: The Frightful First World War

It was the song they sang as they marched to the trenches. “We’re Here Because We’re Here.” It was sung to the tune of Auld Lang Syne, a sardonic joke sung in full-throated defiance of death. “We’re here because we’re here because we’re here because we’re here.”

But underlying that song there is a question: a question to which the song gives no answer, stark in its simplicity. “Why are we here?”

http://cjstone.hubpages.com/hub/Were-Here-Because-Were-Here

———————————————————-

" But the song that summed up the First World War the best was the simplest one of all."

Says it all really.”

- Horrible Histories: The Frightful First World War


2 months ago with 767 notes
Thanks to the fandom being alive again&#8230;
Decided to have a new take on this old baby.
I like it better now.

Thanks to the fandom being alive again…

Decided to have a new take on this old baby.

I like it better now.


5 months ago with 174 notes
Just a little something to look forward to.

Just a little something to look forward to.


9 months ago with 23 notes
belarusknives:

chevalierviolet:

I had to make one no matter what happens.
Because D-Day.
I promise I’ll make legit art soon. Soon.

fyi France didn’t take part in D-Day it was just America, Canada and England

The French Resistance was a key element in the success of the D-Day landings. Actual attacks on the Germans were limited, in part by the viciousness of German reprisals. Instead in the months running up to D-Day, focused on developing intelligence on the German troop dispositions and on construction of the Atlantic Wall. 
The Resistance also attacked the French communications and transportation network&#8212;especially the rail lines. German reprisals were not as severe if German troops were not killed. 
The Resistance had expanded greatly in 1943-44. In part because of the NAZI demands to conscript French workers for forced labor in the Reich and in part because it was becoming increasingly clear that the nazis were losing the War. Estimates suggest that there are 60 intelligence cells solely devoted to collect intelligence. The Allies were collecting intelligence through aerial reconnaissance  but there are limitations to aerial reconnaissance. The Resistance helped to fill in the gaps. 
The Allies received 3,000 written reports as well as 700 radio reports during May 1944 alone. The Resistance succeeded in destroying 1,800 railway engines, nearly as many as the 2,400 destroyed by Allied air operations. The combined impact of this, attacks on bridges, and other transport targets had by June 1944, virtually brought the French transport system to a standstill. This made it very difficult for the Germans to move supplies forward to units manning the Atlantic Wall. 
The Resistance was also very active on the night preceding D-Day as well as the following days. Not only did the Resistance play a key role, but French civilians not formally involved in the Resistance assisted the Allied troops by informing about directions and local German troop dispositions. Of course this occurred throughout the campaign in France, but D-Day was the time that the Allies were most vulnerable and the issue most in doubt.
- http://histclo.com/essay/war/ww2/camp/eur/d-day/dd-res.html

belarusknives:

chevalierviolet:

I had to make one no matter what happens.

Because D-Day.

I promise I’ll make legit art soon. Soon.

fyi France didn’t take part in D-Day it was just America, Canada and England

The French Resistance was a key element in the success of the D-Day landings. Actual attacks on the Germans were limited, in part by the viciousness of German reprisals. Instead in the months running up to D-Day, focused on developing intelligence on the German troop dispositions and on construction of the Atlantic Wall. 

The Resistance also attacked the French communications and transportation network—especially the rail lines. German reprisals were not as severe if German troops were not killed. 

The Resistance had expanded greatly in 1943-44. In part because of the NAZI demands to conscript French workers for forced labor in the Reich and in part because it was becoming increasingly clear that the nazis were losing the War. Estimates suggest that there are 60 intelligence cells solely devoted to collect intelligence. The Allies were collecting intelligence through aerial reconnaissance  but there are limitations to aerial reconnaissance. The Resistance helped to fill in the gaps. 

The Allies received 3,000 written reports as well as 700 radio reports during May 1944 alone. The Resistance succeeded in destroying 1,800 railway engines, nearly as many as the 2,400 destroyed by Allied air operations. The combined impact of this, attacks on bridges, and other transport targets had by June 1944, virtually brought the French transport system to a standstill. This made it very difficult for the Germans to move supplies forward to units manning the Atlantic Wall. 

The Resistance was also very active on the night preceding D-Day as well as the following days. Not only did the Resistance play a key role, but French civilians not formally involved in the Resistance assisted the Allied troops by informing about directions and local German troop dispositions. Of course this occurred throughout the campaign in France, but D-Day was the time that the Allies were most vulnerable and the issue most in doubt.

- http://histclo.com/essay/war/ww2/camp/eur/d-day/dd-res.html


10 months ago with 739 notes
originally chevalierviolet
I had to make one no matter what happens.
Because D-Day.
I promise I&#8217;ll make legit art soon. Soon.

I had to make one no matter what happens.

Because D-Day.

I promise I’ll make legit art soon. Soon.


10 months ago with 739 notes

Commissions Open!

versailles-fairytale:

Hey guys!

Update for art commissions.

I sorta upgraded the quality and stuff so, I hope you guys like it.

Every little bit helps!

Thank you all in advance!

Read More


11 months ago with 36 notes
originally versailles-fairytale

The Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery and Memorial (French:Le Cimetière de Guerre Canadien Groesbeek) is located about three kilometres north of the village of Groesbeek, Netherlands. The cemetery contains 2,338 Canadian soldiers of World War II.

The cemetery is unique in that many of the dead were brought here from nearby Germany. It is one of the few cases where bodies were moved across international frontiers. It is believed that all fallen Canadian soldiers of the Rhineland battles, who were buried in German battlefields, were reinterred here (except for one who is buried in Reichswald Forest War Cemetery). General H.D.G. Crerar, who commanded Canadian land forces in Europe, ordered that Canadian dead were not to be buried in German soil.

Thousands of Dutch children tend the graves of the soldiers buried here as they do throughout the Netherlands.

The cemetery also has a Cross of Sacrifice within it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groesbeek_Canadian_War_Cemetery


11 months ago with 369 notes
paarsetulpen:

the-beautiful-world:

APH Sketch: So Much Like Papa

I’d like to kindly point out that the artists also has a tumblr.

Thank you! &lt;3

paarsetulpen:

the-beautiful-world:

APH Sketch: So Much Like Papa

I’d like to kindly point out that the artists also has a tumblr.

Thank you! <3


1 year ago with 69 notes
originally the-beautiful-world
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